Welcome to Classroom Management for the Practitioner! 
Course Description:  EDU 596 Classroom Management for Practitioners (3) This interactive course is for teachers who are interested in adding to their knowledge base of classroom organizational and management theories and strategies, and additionally, who are interested in designing a Classroom Action Plan to assist in the creation and maintenance of an optimal learning environment in their classroom. Course content includes readings selected by the student to provide a philosophical and theoretical base from which to complete the projects connected to the teacher's areas of interest and need. Course Instructors


Instructor: 

Dr. Timothy Sharer Associate Professor of Education 

Instructors: Dr. Tim Sharer

Office & Phones:

Brandenburg 215      375.7380

 Contact Information:  use the Blogger link in the Course website.

 Class Meeting Time: On-Line



Course Materials:

This course is built heavily on reading, on-line discussion, and the completion of three projects.  The additional materials needed to complete this course will be chosen by the student.





Course Syllabus  EDU 596 Classroom Management for Practitioners 2008/6

Course Description:  EDU 596 Classroom Management for Practitioners (3) This interactive course is for teachers who are interested in adding to their knowledge base of classroom organizational and management theories and strategies, and additionally, who are interested in designing a Classroom Action Plan to assist in the creation and maintenance of an optimal learning environment in their classroom. Course content includes readings selected by the student to provide a philosophical and theoretical base from which to complete the projects connected to the teacher's areas of interest and need.

Organizing Theme
Educational leaders and stewards inquiring, reflecting, and implementing through teaching, learning, and service.

Vision Statement

Educational stewards engage in harmonious inquiry, reflection, and implementation that contribute to the empowerment of individuals and democratic communities. The professional education unit understands the never-ending search for educational wisdom that characterizes graduates who make inquiry, reflection, and implementation habitual. The unit seeks to empower the professional educator with knowledge, skills, and dispositions needed to take a leadership role in the renewal of schools. To this end, it is our vision to create and implement advanced programs that are characterized by breadth, depth, and rigor.

While recognizing that knowledge rapidly becomes obsolete in the information age, the graduate programs are broad in scope to include the array of educational issues faced by an ever-changing world and a constantly re-examined P-12 curriculum. This breadth will produce professional educators and school leaders with special abilities as well as specializations. It encompasses both an intellectual and a moral dimension in to ensure that the educational efforts of a democratic society are arranged so as to provide equal access to quality education for all children.

Although broad in design, the advanced programs focus on depth of content including knowledge of the discipline(s), applied research, the wisdom of practice, and a repertoire of techniques and tools that enable professionals to practice their craft with fervor and passion. For those with a vision for educational excellence in a restructured school system, the rigor of our programs will be a source of pride for dedicated professionals.

Mission Statement

The mission of the unit is to facilitate the development of dynamic professional educators who collaborate for the benefit of self and others, school, community, and the profession. This mission is accomplished through inquiry, reflection, excellence in teaching and learning, and regional service.

Purpose

The purpose of advanced programs at Wayne State College is to prepare educational leaders and stewards who continually inquire and reflect on theory and practice to support excellence and implement responsible change. Specifically, our purpose is to prepare students for positions of leadership and stewardship in curriculum and instruction, educational administration, counseling, and special education.

 Graduate Education Outcomes

1 Inquire and Change
2 Reflect
3 Implement Responsible Change

4 Create and Maintain Caring Communities
5 Communicate Effectively
6 Leadership and Stewardship

Course Goals and Objectives (parenthetical numbers are Outcome correlates)

  1. To create an environment for a community of learners (4)
  2. Use effective processes to establish, monitor, and revise classroom procedures which will protect the dignity of all, facilitate learning, and create positive attitudes towards learning. (1,2,3,4,5,6)
  3. Develop cooperative relationships with children, parents, and agencies to promote appropriate child behavior. (3, 4, 5, 6)
  4. Develop child self-monitoring strategies for responsible behavior. (1,2,3,4,5,6)
  5. Monitor children’s progress to maintain learning through goal setting and encouragement. (1,2,3,4,5,6)
  6. Monitor and adjust planning and instruction to facilitate learning. (1,2,3,4,5,6)
  7. Manage classroom time to help children achieve learning goals. (1,2,3,4,5,6)
  8. Proactively reduce unconventional child behavior. (1,2,3,4,5,6)
  9. Maintain a positive classroom environment. (1,2,3,4,5,6)
  10. Develop leadership styles which promote appropriate learning climates. (1,2,3,4,5,6)
  11. Base classroom and behavior management decisions on recognized theories. (1,2,3,4,5,6)
  12. Enable children to develop socially acceptable behaviors. (1,2,3,4,5,6)
  13. How to plan, implement, and assess to facilitate children’s learning, develop positive

attitudes toward learning, and demonstrate a caring attitude toward protecting the dignity of others. (1,2,3,4,5,6)

  1. Prepare and implement activities to facilitate children learning.  (1,2,3,4,5,6)
  2. Assess child learning. (1,2,3,4,5,6)
  3. Assess instructional effectiveness. (1,2,3,4,5,6)
  4. Prepare reports and interpret information to children, parents, and/or guardians, and professionals. (1,2,3,4,5,6)
  5. Communicate and show by example respect for cultural, social, and racial diversity and equity. (1,2,3,4,5,6)

Course Assignments & Course Evaluation Criteria (see below) 

Course Schedule (see below)



            Course Assignments

 

Area     Area 1: Readings & Annotated Bibliography on Theories of Behavioral Development  

Course Project 1 for Area 1: Student Selected Readings: The readings for this course provide you with choices based on your interests, needs and teaching assignments.  Each participant will select the designated number of readings from each of the Major Books Lists 1 & 2 and the directed number from Books to Manage the Social Curriculum reading categories to read and annotate in your bibliography. The Annotated Bibliography is explained below (Course Project 2). Due:  May 6 5:00 p.m.  Student’s grade for Area 1 is determined by the number of read pages [see below for details]:

Major books -

1.       List 1: Select 1 book from this list:

o    Choice Theory by William Glasser [336]

o    Teaching Children to Care by Ruth Sidney Charney [408]

o    The Disciplined Mind: Beyond Facts and Standardized Tests, the K-12 Education that Every Child Deserves by Howard Gardner [260]

o    The Myth of Laziness by Mel Levine [258]

o    Punished by Rewards by Alfie Kohn [300]

o    Teaching with Love & Logic by Jim Fay & David Funk [364]

 

2.       List 2 - Select 2 books from this list or Select 1 book from this list and substitute a book selection of your choice for the second title. Participants may also select 15 Journal articles in lieu of one of these List 2 titles to read and annotate in your bibliography (see Item 2).  You may base your selections on your areas of need.  Your reading selections in this category should be based on and connected to the more serious classroom problem you will research and document in your Behavior Improvement Plan for your Area 4 Project.

 

Please secure instructor permission before starting:

o    Setting Limits in the Classroom by Robert MacKenzie [322]

o    Schools Where Everyone Belongs by Stan Davis [205]

o    Bullying in American Schools by Anne Garrett [162]

o    The Bully, the Bullied and the Bystander by Barbara Coloroso [203]

o    Techniques for Managing Verbally and Physically Aggressive Students  by Johns & Carr [161]

o    The Soul of Education by Rachel Kessler [171]

o    Bright Minds, Poor Grades by Michael Whitley[293]

o    They Can But They Don’t by Jerome Bruns [216]

o    Talk It Out by Barbara Porro [145]

o    The Hurried Child  by David Elkind [221]

o    Pedagogy of the Oppressed by Paolo Freire [183]

o    Ten Talks Parents Must Have with Their Children About Violence by Dominic Cappello [323]

o    Or Select 1 book from this list and substitute a book selection of your choice for the second title to read and annotate in your bibliography (Course Project 2).  You may base your selections on your areas of need.

o    Or Select 1 book from this list and substitute 15 Journal articles for the second title to read and annotate in your bibliography (Course Project 2).  You may base your selections on your areas of need.

 

3.       Books to Manage the Social Curriculum

Each participant will select readings from the category below of their choice to read and annotate in your bibliography (see Item 2).  As you make your selections, consider how you may use these books with young children as Read-Aloud Books to help you manage the Social Curriculum or to recommend as readings for older children who may be experiencing a similar problem and you’re guiding them to develop their own healthy and successful solutions. You should primarily base your selections on your areas of need.  Each participant will select/create a reading list from these categories: [minimum 8 titles with at least one from each category]

K-3 (select 1 or more)

o    Miss Nelson is Missing by Harry Allard [32]

o    Anna Banana and Me by Lenore Blegvad [32]

o    The Knight and the Dragon by Tomie De Paola [32]

o    Meet Danitra Brown by Nikki Grimes [32]

o    John Jeremy Colton by Bryan Jeffery Leech [40]

o    A Taste of Blackberries by Doris Buchanan Smith [32]

o    Choose selections with instructor approval

4-8  (select 1 or more)

o    I Don't March to the Beat of a Different Drummer: I'm the Whole Band: Perceptions of a Bipoloar Life by Leslie Jay [85]

o    Confessions from the Principal’s Chair by Anna Meyers [192]

o    Firegirl by Tony Abbott [160]

o    Sahara Special by Esme Raji Codell [192]

o    There’s A Boy in the Girl’s Bathroom by Louis Sacher [208]

o    Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli [208]

o    Love by Jerry Spinelli [288]

o    Holes by Louis Sachar [240]

o    Jake Drake Bully Buster by Andrew Clements [73]

o    The Jacket by Andrew Clements [96]

o     Bullies Are A Pain in the Brain by Trevor Romain [100]

o    Choose selections with instructor approval

9-12  (select 1 or more)

o    Odd Girl Out by Rachel Simmons [320]

o    Please Stop Laughing at Me by Jodee Blanco [288]

o    Shattered Crystals by Mia Amalia Kanner [406]

o    The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie [240]

o    Choose selection with instructor approval

 

Course Project 2 for Area 1: Annotated Bibliography from Your Selected Readings. 

Directions: You will create an Annotated Bibliography from your selected readings which must be formatted in APA 5th Edition.  The substance of the annotations should include notes of key points and ideas you will incorporate as a professional educator. Those key points should include title’s strengths/why, weakness/why, and ideas you would implement or not implement/why. The annotations should meet these minimums:

o    Major Book:  List 1: 300 word annotations per title

o    Major Book List 2 250 word annotations per title

o    Books to Manage the Social Curriculum:

§  K-3:  50 word minimum annotations per title

§  4-8:   75 word minimum annotations per title

§  9-12: 75 word minimum annotations per title

o    Journal Articles: 100 word annotations per title

 

Sample Annotated Bibliography Entry: [this simple contains 425 words and incorporates the requirements as per the Directions]

 

Payne, R. (2001). A Framework for Understanding Poverty. (revised edition). Houston, TX: aha!

                Process, Inc.

 

Abstract: This book contains important information for teachers about how people in poverty face challenges virtually unknown to those in middle class or wealth--challenges from both obvious and hidden sources. The reality of being poor brings out a survival mentality, and turns attention away from opportunities taken for granted by everyone else. If you work with people from poverty, some understanding of how different their world is from yours will be invaluable. Whether you're an educator--or a social, health, or legal services professional--this breakthrough book gives you practical, real-world support and guidance to improve your effectiveness in working with people from all socioeconomic backgrounds. Since 1995 this book has guided hundreds of thousands of educators and other professionals through the pitfalls and barriers faced by all classes, especially the poor. Carefully researched and packed with charts, tables, and questionnaires, the book not only documents the facts of poverty, it provides practical yet compassionate strategies for addressing its impact on people's lives. A Framework for Understanding Poverty was Dr. Ruby Payne's first book, written for teachers with adaptations for work and community members. Its purpose is to educate people about the differences that separate economic classes and then teaching them strategies to bridge those gulfs. Payne discusses at length the social cues or "hidden rules" that govern how we think and interact in society and the significance of those rules in a classroom. Other topics include why students from generational poverty often fear being educated, discipline interventions that improve behavior, and the eight resources that make a difference to success. The strengths include the opening references to the types of resources (of which financial are only a part) people need to break out of poverty.  Included is an intriguing section on the "hidden rules" of the different classes. Equally intriguing was the section on use of the "formal" and "casual registers" in speaking. A number of practical classroom techniques are described in the latter part of the book. The practical examples of speaking registers presented useful ideas and information that good teachers already take into account when dealing with kids and families. Knowing both the verbal and non-verbal messages our words communicate and the more subtle nuances of words should facilitate a close examination of the absolute effectiveness of our personal communication techniques. Payne’s analysis is useful in connecting better with parents and students stuck in generational poverty. All books are impacted by the experience a reader brings to them. For someone deeply entrenched in the middle class, this books speaks directly to them.

 

Due:  May 6 5:00 p.m.   Student’s grade for Area 1 is determined by the number of read pages and a correct completed Annotated Bibliography.

                A =  1500 pages

                B =  1200 pages

                            NC = No credit for Area 1 Projects 1 & 2


Area 2: Discussion Forum on Management Theories:  

 

Course Project 1 for Area 2: Discussion Forum on Management Theories & Practices:

Directions:  A weekly topic will be posted by the instructor.  Participants are expected to post an initial response to the topic/question and then at least one follow-up thread per weekly topic.  Follow-ups threads may be connected to their own initial posting or be a response to the initial postings or threaded follow-ups of others. Topics will include but not be limited to Behavior Development Theories; Classroom Routines and Procedures; Conversations to Change Behavior; Ethics of Classroom Management; Philosophies of Behavior Management; How and When to Secure Help; Building and Maintaining Healthy and Productive Relationship with Students; Who Are the Students We’re Teaching; Perspectives on Conflict and Cooperation; and Topics Chosen by Participants. New Topics will be posted on Friday afternoon for the following week. Postings for the current week are due each Friday at 5:00 p.m. for that week’s Topics.

 

Course Project 2 for Area 2: Surveys Toward Children (SATC):

Directions:  Complete each of the 2 surveys found at the following websites:

 Survey of Attitudes Toward Children (SATC) [www.homeofbob.com/phpPractice/sat.html]

Teacher Variance Inventory (TVI) [www.homeofbob.com/phpPractice/TVI.html]

Once finished submit your scores to the instructor.  These surveys will help you identify your attitudes about working with students and your instinctive first responses to behavior situations in the classroom. Due: Friday, January 23 5:00 p.m.

Course Project 3 for Area 2: Applications of Theories of Behavior Development in Six Case Study Identifications on Chris

Directions: Read, Study and Reflect on the six theories of behavioral development codified by Irwin Hyman at this website: http://www.homeofbob.com/cman/general/modelChrt.html .  Those Six Theories [1) Behavioral; 2) Cognitive; 3) Psychodynamic Interpersonal; 4) Ecological Environmental; 5) Biophysical; and 6) Humanistic are also directly connected to your Scores on the Teacher Variance Inventory and will help you identify what behavioral theory you tend to use in your first response interventions. After reading, comparing your TVI tendencies to the ideas in each theory and reflecting on your actions, go to the following website: http://www.homeofbob.com/cman/fictn/index.html. You will be reading the Six Case Studies on Chris [History and Clones 1-6] and analyzing each case study to identify the Behavioral Development Theory used by the SAT thtat best describes what the student is trying to achieve and to facilitate the type of interventions used in that case study. You have six case studies and six behavioral theories so choose only one theory for each case study and do not select a theory more than once.  In the real world we recognize that behavioral theories overlap as do interventions.  However, for this assignment, please use each theory only once. Hint:  It frequently is easier to identify the chosen intervention first and then work backwords to align the intervention with the appropriate theory. A Case Study Identification Framework can be found in the EDU 596W0 Course Materials Folder on the G-Drive through your E-Campus account.

Due: Friday, February 20 5:00 p.m.  

 

Student’s grade for Area 2 is determined by meeting the minimum requirements for the Discussion Forums each week and the submission of a correct completed Case Studies Identification Matrix and submitted SATC and TVI Scores.

                A =  Completed/Submitted TVI and SATC Scores; submitted correct Case Studies Identification Matrix;  One Discussion Forum 

                        Posting and One Follow-Up Posting per week.

                NC = No credit for Area 2 Projects 1, 2 & 3

           Area 3: Pro-Active Classroom Management

 
Course Project 1 for Area 3: Teacher Action Plan Due:  March 20 5:00 p.m.

 

PART ONE: TEACHER ACTION PLAN BELIEF STATEMENTS

Directions:  For each of the five categories listed below, compose five statements using the given stem to represent your beliefs for each category.  [An example in each category is provided.]

Students

I believe that students:

Should experience success in learning.

Learning

I believe that learning:

Occurs in programs where teachers emphasize progress, challenge students and provide variety.

Teachers

I believe that teachers:

                Are more successful when they share meaningful decision-making power with their students.

Social Interactions

I believe that social interactions:

                Are an opportunity to teach and practice pro-social skills.

Educational Programs

I believe that educational programs:

                Should be created with student success in mind.

 

PART TWO: POLICY STATEMENTS AND PROCEDURES FOR IMPLEMENTING TEACHER POLICIES AND EXPECTED OUTCOMES

Directions:  For each of the thirteen categories listed below, compose a minimum of 1 Policy Statement [Guarantee you will make for your Students].  Within each category for each Policy Statement compose a minimum of 1 Procedure Statement [How you will achieve your Guarantee]. Within each category for each Procedure Statement compose a minimum of 1 Expected Student Outcome [What will be the predicted result when you achieve your Guarantee].  An example from the category Leadership is provided below the category listings.

 

POLICIES, PROCEDURES AND EXPECTED STUDENT OUTCOMES CATEGORIES:

      LEADERSHIP

TEACHER EXPECTATIONS

 MOTIVATION

 PLANNING

 LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

 INSTRUCTION

 SOCIAL INTERACTIONS

 ASSESSMENT

CLASSROOM CODE OF CONDUCT/RULES

PROACTIVE MANAGEMENT

COPING WITH PROBLEMS

PARENTS AND COMMUNITY

PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT

 

(Below is a sample of how to format your Teacher Action Plan Policies, Procedures and Outcomes)

 

LEADERSHIP

POLICY

PROCEDURES

EXPECTED OUTCOMES

To facilitate student learning in the area of leadership I will guarantee my students that I will reflect the values and attitudes of the community by:

 

Being actively involved in community activities.

 

Explaining my community service to the students

 

 

Linking classroom activities to community activities.

Students will see community involvement modeled by their teacher.

 

Students will hear and understand the roles I play and the results of my service.

 

 

Students will learn about the community they live in.

 

Students will learn how to become actively involved in community projects.

 

Students will find value in the learning experiences of school and connect what they have learned to real life experiences.

PART THREE:  REFERENCES

Directions:  Document all the resources you have encountered that have had an impact on your Teacher Action Plan.   Use APA 5th Edition Format. An example is provided below.

 

Glasser, W. (1998). Choice theory: A new psychology of personal freedom. New York: Harper Collins Publishers.

Kessler, Rachael. (2000 ). The Soul of Education: Helping Students Find Connection, Compassion, and Character at School. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. 

Due:  Friday, March 20 5:00 p.m.  Student’s grade for Area 3 is determined by points earned on the Teacher Action Plan Grading Rubric: A =  93-100 points;  B = 86-92 points; C = 80-85 points; Below 80 = No credit for Area 3 project [rubric posted on website]

 

 
Area 4: Focus on More Serious Classroom Problems:  

Directions: You will individually or with other course participants select a problem from your classroom or one of the problems below under the heading Potential Problems to Research that would provide you with an opportunity to develop ideas on “How to handle extreme classroom problems.”

Once your problem is selected, you will follow these steps:

  1. Select the resources you will need to facilitate your research into your problem. A minimal list of topical resources is included in the table below. You are welcome to select additional relevant sources to assist you in finding solutions and interventions to your classroom problem. 
  2. Outline the Pros and Cons of different intervention strategies for the problem.
  3. Use your research and personal perspectives to assist you in identifying intervention procedures to resolve the problem.
  4. From your research and personal perspective provide a theoretical or philosophical rationale and its potential success in resolving the problem.
  5. Document your Problem using a Behavioral Improvement Plan (BIP/Six Step Behavior Management Plan see below) or Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA) or another format of your choice (one from your school). (An electronic copy of the Format can be obtained from the G-Drive in the Course Materials Folder on the E-Campus Website)

 

Course Project for Area 4: Behavior Improvement Plan 

Directions:    Below is an outline of a Behavior Improvement Plan.  If you already have a format that you have used, please feel welcome to use that format for this project.  Your format should holistically embrace similar components to the plan below. If you do not have a format, the one listed below is both comprehensive and complete. Each course participant will select a student with whom they work or a serious classroom problem to investigate and document using a Behavioral Improvement Plan to address a more serious and/or recidivist behavior that has caused the student(s) to struggle in achieving success in the classroom academically, interpersonally, culturally, behaviorally, or socio-politically. The steps in this process are outlined below and a BIP format follows the outline.

 
Background Information:

a.       Student First Name

b.       Student Age; Grade; Birthday

c.        Behavioral or Instructional Issue

d.       Date

e.        Team Members

Step 1. Collect Reliable Information:

a. Teacher perceptions about the behavioral issue

b. Student perceptions about the behavioral issue

c. Other important information

d. Current interaction pattern between student and teacher and student and other students

Step 2. Analysis

a.       Anecdotal or observational information

a.       Antecedent: Thoughts, feelings or actions before the behavior was exhibited

b.       Behavior that is causing the problem

c.        Consequence what are the results of the problem behavior for the student; other

            students; teacher, etc.

b.       How is each party contributing to the problem?

a.       Teacher variables

b.       Student variables

c.        Task variables

d.       Environmental variables

e.        Communicative Factors

c.        What is the student trying to obtain or avoid through this behavior?

Step 3. Hypothesis for the Cause of the Problem and Support for Your Decision [Theorists’ names in brackets]

a.       What is/are the cause(s) of this behavior?

b.       Why do you believe this is or these are the cause(s)?

c.        What Theory(s) would you connect to the cause of this behavior?

a.       Behavioral (Stimulus-Response) [Skinner; Watson; Pavlov]

b.       Cognitive (Choice Theory) [Glasser; Premack; Bandura; Elias; Clabby; Ellis; O’Leary; Shure]

c.        Biophysical (Medical/Organic) [Levine; Bender; Chess; Cruickshank; Delecato; Fernald; Frostig; Kephart]

d.       Environmental/Ecological [Barker; Canter; Curwin & Mendler; Glasser; Jones; Kounin; Lewin; Redl; Gump]

e.        Psychodynamic/Interpersonal [Adler; Albert; Berne; Dreikurs; Erickson; Freud; Ginott; Piaget]

f.        Humanistic [Maslow; Glasser; Charles; Allport; Goodman; Herdon; Hoit; Rogers; Rousseau]

g.        Mistaken Goals [Dreikurs]

                                       i.      Power

                                      ii.      Attention

                                    iii.      Revenge

                                    iv.      Assumed Inadequacy

h.       Instructional/Organizational [Jerome Bruns; Mel Levine; Michael Whitley]

i.         Learned Helplessness [Jerome Bruns; Mel Levine; Michael Whitley]

d.                             What does the Student Say about Your Hypothesis?

Step 4. Hypothesis for Change and Reasons for Change

a.       Target Behavior Goal

b.       Explain why the student needs to change their current behavioral pattern(s).

c.        Identify Other Behaviors that Would Serve the Same Function for the Child as the unconventional behavior and the reasons for your choice. Be specific

d.       Identify the Skills the child will need to change (social, organizational, communicative, study, goal setting, cognitive etc.)

Step 5. Intervention Steps: List goals, interventions, methods, resources, person responsible, and completion date for each of the following categories:

a.       Developing Personal Worth and Self-Efficacy

b.       Home Support

c.        Motivate Change

d.       Curriculum, Instruction and Task Adaptations

e.        Communication

f.        Self-Regulation

g.        Environmental Modifications

h.       Plan to Generalize New Behaviors to Other Settings

i.         Social Relations

Step 6. Evaluation Strategy

a. For each of the nine category goals describe the information you intend to collect to determine if the

child has met the target behavior goal.

b. For each of the nine category goals describe how you will evaluate the collected information and  how you will determine if the child 

       has met the goals. 

c.  How will you report this information?

d.  To whom?

 

Student’s grade for Area 4 is determined by points earned on the Six Step Behavior Improvement Plan Grading Rubric: A =  93-100 points;  B = 86-92 points; C = 80-85 points; Below 80 = No credit for Area 4 project. [rubric posted on website]  Due:  Friday, April 24 5:00 p.m.

 
Potential Problems to Research

Problems

Recommended Readings

Inability to Resolve Problems

Kreidler, W. (1994). Teaching conflict resolution through children's literature. New York, NY: Scholastic Professional Books.

Porro, B. (1996). Talk It Out: Conflict Resolution in the Elementary Classroom. Alexandria: VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.  

Bullying and Other Forms of Aggressive Behavior

Blanco, J. (2003). Please Stop Laughing At Me. Avon, MA: Adams Media Corporation.

Coloroso, B. (2003). The Bully, the Bullied and the Bystander. New York: Harper-Collins Publishers, Inc.

Dorn, M. (2003). Weakfish. Canada: Safe Havens, International.

Garabino, J. & deLara, E. (2002). And Words Can Hurt Forever: How to Protect Adolescents from Bullying, Harassment, and Emotional Violence. New York: Simon & Schuster.

Garrett, A. (2003).  Bullying in American Schools. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company, Inc.

Johns, B. & Carr, V. (1995). Techniques for managing verbally and physically aggressive students. Denver, CO: Love Publishing Company.

Olweus, D. (1993) Bullying At School. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing.

Davis, S. (2005). Schools Where Everyone Belongs. Champaign, IL: Research Press.

Kids Who are Capable but Don’t Do the Work -

Learned Helplessness & Work Inhibition  

Bruns, J. (1993) They can but they don't: helping students overcome work inhibition. New York, NY: Penguin Books.

Whitley, M. (2001). Bright Minds, Poor Grades. New York: Perigee Books.

Serious Biophysical Problems (ADD, HD, Bipolar, FAS, OCD, Addictions, Diabetes, Seizures, Allergies, Dyslexia)

Levine, M. (2002). A Mind At A Time. New York: Simon & Schuster

Levine, M. (2003). The Myth of Laziness. New York: Simon & Schuster

Lack of Social Skills  

Charney, R, (1997). Habits of Goodness: Case studies in the social curriculum. Greenfield, MA: Northeast Foundation for Children.

Davis, B. (2006). How to Teach Children Who Don’t Look Like You. 

Delpit, L. (1996). Other People's Children: Cultural Conflicts in the Classroom. New Press.

Fay, J. & Funk, D. (1995). Teaching with Love and Logic. Golden, CO: Love & Logic Press.

MacKenzie, R. (2003). Setting Limits in the Classroom. New York: Three Rivers Press.

Uncaring Classrooms –

Glasser, W. (1998). Choice Theory  

Charney, R. (1992). Teaching Children to Care  

Goleman, D. (1995). Emotional Intelligence  

Goleman, D. (2006). Social Intelligence

Ritchhart, R. (2002). Intellectual Character

Freire, P. (2000). Pedagogy of the Oppressed

 

 

 


 

Course Schedule and Project Deadlines:  

 This information is located on the course website at: https://online.wsc.edu/portal




Course Bibliography for Classroom Management

Class Participants are encouraged to make selections from this list as requested substitutions for those listed above in the Major Books Lists 1 & 2.

Beane, A. (1999). The Bully Free Classroom. Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit Publishing.

Blanco, J. (2003). Please Stop Laughing At Me. Avon, MA: Adams Media Corporation.

Bruns, Jerome. (1993) They can but they don't: helping students overcome work inhibition. New York, NY: Penguin Books.

Burke, K. (2000). What To Do With The Kid Who . . . (2nd ed). Arlington Heights, IL: Skylight Professional Development.

Campbell, L. (2003). Mindful Learning: 101 Proven Strategies for Student and Teacher Success. Corwin Press

Cappello, D. (2000). Ten Talks Parents Must Have With Their Children About Violence. New York: Hyperion Press.

Charles, C.M. (2002). Essential Elements of Effective Discipline. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Charney, Ruth Sidney, (1992). Teaching children to care: Management in the responsive classroom. Greenfield, MA: Northeast Foundation for Children.

Charney, Ruth Sidney, (1997). Habits of Goodness: Case studies in the social curriculum. Greenfield, MA: Northeast Foundation for Children.

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