Award Winning Books


Conn Library's collection contains many award winning books. Use the following brochures (in PDF format) to select your next reading choice.


Pulitzer Prize

 

The Pulitzer Prize is a U.S. award for achievements in newspaper journalism, literature and musical composition. It was established by Joseph Pulitzer and is administered by Columbia University in New York City. Prizes are awarded yearly in twenty-one categories. In twenty of these, each winner receives a certificate and a $10,000 cash reward.


National Book Award

 

On March 15, 1950, a consortium of book publishing groups sponsored the first annual National Book Awards Ceremony and Dinner at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York City. Their goal was to enhance the public's awareness of exceptional books written by fellow Americans, and to increase the popularity of reading in general. Today, the Awards are given to recognize achievements in four genres: Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry, and Young People's Literature. The Winners, selected by five-member, independent judging panels for each genre, receive a $10,000 cash award and a crystal sculpture.


Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction & Nonfiction

 

The Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Nonfiction were established in 2012 to recognize the best fiction and nonfiction books for adult readers published in the U.S. the previous year. The shortlisted authors and eventual winners reflect the expert judgment and insight of the seven-member selection committee of library professionals who work closely with adult readers. These are the ALA's first single-book awards for adult trade fiction and non-fiction.


Book Awards for Children & Young Adults

  • American Indian Youth Literature Award
    The American Indian Youth Services Literature was established by the American Indian Library Association in 2006 as a way to identify and honor the very best writing and illustrations by and about American Indians. Books selected to receive the award will present Native Americans in the fullness of their humanity in the present and past contexts.

  • Boston Globe-Horn Book Award (Picture Book | Fiction & Poetry | NonFiction)
    First presented in 1967 and customarily announced in June, the Boston Globe–Horn Book Awards are among the most prestigious honors in the field of children's and young adult literature. Winners are selected in three categories: Picture Book, Fiction and Poetry, and Nonfiction. Two Honor Books may be named in each category. On occasion, a book will receive a special citation for its high quality and overall creative excellence. The winning titles must be published in the United States but they may be written or illustrated by citizens of any country. The awards are chosen by an independent panel of three judges who are annually appointed by the Editor of the Horn Book.

  • Caldecott Medal
    The Caldecott Medal is awarded annually by the Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association, to the artist of the most distinguished American picture book for children published that year. It was named in honor of nineteenth-century English illustrator Randolph Caldecott. Together with the Newbery Medal, it is the most prestigious American children's book award.

  • Coretta Scott King Award
    The Coretta Scott King Award is an annual award presented by the Ethnic & Multicultural Information Exchange Round Table, part of the American Library Association (ALA). Named for Coretta Scott King, wife of Martin Luther King, Jr., this award recognizes outstanding African American authors and illustrators. The book must be about the African American experience, and be written for a youth audience (high school or below).

  • Edgar Allen Poe Award (Juvenile & Young Adult)
    The Edgar Allan Poe Awards (popularly called the Edgars), named after Edgar Allan Poe, are presented every year by the Mystery Writers of America. They honor the best in mystery fiction, non-fiction, television, film, and theatre published or produced in the previous year.

  • Golden Sower Award
    On top of the Nebraska State Capitol in Lincoln, stands a 19,000 pound, bronze statue known as the Sower. He stands barefoot and without hat, sowing seeds in the most primitive manner. He is symbolic of the state of Nebraska as a major agricultural state. He is not merely sowing seeds of grain, but something much greater. He is the symbol of sowing the seeds of agriculture, life, hope and prosperity. The Sower was chosen as the symbol of the Nebraska children's choice literary award for similar reasons. The award's sponsors, the Nebraska Library Association, hope the program will sow seeds which: stimulate children's thinking, introduce different types of literature, encourage independent reading, increase library skills, and foster an appreciation for excellence in writing and illustrating.

  • John Newbery Medal
    The John Newbery Medal is a literary award given by the Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association (ALA). The award is given to the author of the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children. The award has been given since 1922. It was the first children's literary award in the world. It is named for John Newbery, an 18th century publisher of juvenile books.

  • Michael L Printz Award
    The Michael L. Printz Award is an award for a book that exemplifies literary excellence in young adult literature. It is named for a Topeka, Kansas school librarian who was a long-time active member of the Young Adult Library Services Association. 

  • Orbis Pictus Award for Outstanding Nonfiction
    Τhe world of children's literature contains a variety of genres, all of which have appeal to the diverse interests of children, as well as potential for classroom teaching. In recent years, non-fiction or informational books ave emerged as a very attractive, exciting, and popular genre. The NCTE Orbis Pictus Award Committee established the award in 1990 for promoting and recognizing excellence in the writing of nonfiction for children. The name Orbis Pictus commemorates the work of Johannes Amos Comenius, Orbis Pictus—The World in Pictures (1657), considered to be the first book actually planned for children. The award is presented by the Orbis Pictus Committee Chair during the Books for Children Luncheon at the NCTE Annual Convention year. Although only one title is singled out for the award, up to five Honor Books are also recognized.

  • Pura Belpré Award
    The Pura Belpré Award is named after the first Latina librarian at the New York Public Library. The Pura Belpré Award, established in 1996, is presented to a Latino/Latina writer and illustrator whose work best portrays, affirms, and celebrates the Latino cultural experience in an outstanding work of literature for children and youth.

  • Robert F. Sibert Medal
    The Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Medal is awarded annually to the author(s) and illustrator(s) of the most distinguished informational book published in the United StatesEnglish during the preceding year. The award is named in honor of Robert F. Sibert, the long-time President of Bound to Stay Bound Books, Inc. of Jacksonville, Illinois. ALSC administers the award. .

  • Scott O-Dell Award for Historical Fiction
    In 1982, Scott O'Dell established The Scott O'Dell Award for Historical Fiction. The annual award of $5,000 goes to an author for abook published in the previous year for children or young adults.Scott O'Dell established this award to encourage other writers--particularly new authors--to focus on historical fiction. He hoped in this way to increase the interest of young readers in the historical background that has helped to shape their country and their world.